Chemistry 835

Fall 2013

Analytical Chemistry

Course Organization, Lecture Syllabus and Other Important Information

Chemistry 835 is the second of two courses on Advanced Analytical Chemistry.  The course covers the subject areas of Mass Spectrometry, Molecular Spectroscopy, and Separation Science.

Textbook:  

The textbook, which is not used heavily, is Chemical Instrumentation: A Systematic Approach. Third Edition, by Howard A. Strobel and William R. Heineman, John Wiley & Sons, 1989. However, this text will not cover many concepts in the course and will be supplemented by other materials. If you do not wish to purchase this text, that is fine as older students may have a copy you can borrow. During the Mass Spectrometry module, students may find the following texts useful as references (but are not required reading): De Hoffmann, E. and Stroobant, V. "Mass Spectrometry: Principles and Applications", 3rd Edition, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 2007; Watson, J.T. and Sparkman, O.D. “Introduction to Mass Spectrometry: Instrumentation, Applications, and Strategies for Data Interpretation”, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2007.

Lectures:

The lectures are given Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8:00 to 8:50 AM in Room 183 Chemistry.  A tentative lecture schedule is attached. 

The lecturers are:

Professor Gary Blanchard (Molecular Spectroscopy)

Room 328 Chemistry

Phone: 355-9715 x224

Email: blanchard@chemistry.msu.edu

Office Hours: Wednesday, 9 to 10 AM or by appointment

 

Professor A. Dan Jones (Mass Spectrometry)

Room 215A Biochemistry

Phone: 432-7126

Email: jonesar4@msu.edu

Office Hours: Wednesday, 9-10 AM or by appointment

 

Professor Gavin E. Reid (Separation Science)

Room 229 Chemistry

Phone: 355-9715 x198

Email: reid@chemistry.msu.edu

Office Hours: Wednesday, 9-10 AM or by appointment

 

Problem Sets:

Problem sets will be given to aid in illustrating the concepts and principles discussed in the lectures.  All students are required to do the problem sets because the ability to work these problems is often related to performance on the examinations, and is vital for understanding concepts.

Quizzes

Frequent quizzes will be given in class.

Examinations:

Three 50-minute examinations will be given in the course. The dates of these exams are:

Hour Exam I:   Monday, September 30th, in class
Hour Exam II:  Friday, November 1st, in class
Hour Exam III: Friday, December 6th, in class

Grading:

The grading of the course will be on the following basis:

 

Percentage of total grade

Molecular Spectroscopy

33.3%

Mass Spectrometry

33.3%

Separation Science

33.3%

Within the different areas, grading will be as follows.

Molecular Spectroscopy

 

Percentage of total grade

Quizzes

25%

Homework

25%

Exam 2

50%

 

Mass Spectrometry

 

Percentage of total grade

Quizzes

25%

Homework

25%

Exam 2

50%

 

Separation Science

 

Percentage of total grade

Quizzes

25%

Homework

25%

Exam III

50%

 Lecture Syllabus:

Part I – Molecular Spectroscopy

Lecture 1

August 28

Course Introduction

Blanchard

Lecture 2

August 30

Survey of spectroscopy, Beer’s Law

Blanchard

 

September 2

No Class – Labor Day

 

Lecture 3

September 4

Interaction of light with matter I

Blanchard

Lecture 4

September 6

Interaction of light with matter II

Blanchard

Lecture 5

September 9

Optical susceptibility of materials

Blanchard

Lecture 6

September 11

The Einstein coefficients

Blanchard

Lecture 7

September 13

Molecular electronic and vibrational transitions.

Blanchard

Lecture 8

September 16

The Franck-Condon principle

Blanchard

Lecture 9

September 18

Spontaneous Raman scattering

Blanchard

Lecture 10

September 20

Linear and nonlinear response

Blanchard

Lecture 11

September 23

Components 1 – choosing a light source

Blanchard

Lecture 12

September 25

Components 2 – wavelength separation

Blanchard

Lecture 13

September 27

Components 3 – detection technology

Blanchard

 

September 30

Exam I

Blanchard

 

Part II – Mass Spectrometry

Lecture 14

October 2

Information in molecular ions: Mass resolution, mass measurement accuracy, and isotopes

Jones

Lecture 15

October 4

Vacuum systems and ion detectors

Jones

Lecture 16

October 7

Collisions of ions: ion activation and fragmentation (Quiz 1)

Jones

Lecture 17

October 9

Ionization: Electron Ionization (EI) and photoionization (Homework 1 due)

Jones

Lecture 18

October 11

Ionization: Chemical Ionization (CI) and ion-molecule reactions

Jones

Lecture 19

October 14

Ionization: Atmospheric Pressure Ionization: Electrospray and APCI

Jones

Lecture 20

October 16

MALDI and Desorption Ionization (Quiz 2)

Jones

Lecture 21

October 18

Filtering Mass analyzers: Sectors and Quadrupoles

Jones

Lecture 22

October 21

Ion Trapping Mass analyzers I: Quadrupole Ion Traps

Jones

Lecture 23

October 23

Ion Trapping Mass analyzers II: Orbitraps and FT-ICR (Homework 2 due)

Jones

Lecture 24

October 25

Time-of-Flight Mass Analyzers

Jones

Lecture 25

October 28

Tandem Mass Spectrometry (Quiz 3)

Jones

Lecture 26

October 30

Quantitative Analysis using Mass Spectrometry

Jones

 

November 1

Exam II

Jones

 

Part III – Separation Science

Lecture 27

November 4

Intro/Need for Separation Science

Reid

Lecture 28

November 6

Principles of Flow I

Reid

Lecture 29

November 8

Principles of Flow II

Reid

Lecture 30

November 11

GC I

Reid

Lecture 31

November 13

GC II

Reid

Lecture 32

November 15

LC I

Reid

Lecture 33

November 18

LC II

Reid

Lecture 34

November 20

LC III

Reid

Lecture 35

November 22

CE I

Reid

Lecture 36

November 25

CE II

Reid

Lecture 37

November 27

Microfluidic Devices

Reid

 

November 29

No Class – Thanksgiving break

 

Lecture 38

December 2

Other Separation Techniques

Reid

Lecture 39

December 4

Review

Reid

 

December 6

Exam III

Reid

Religious Observances / Other Absences from Class:

It is the responsibility of students who plan to be absent from class at certain times throughout the semester, due to religious holidays or other reasons, to make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Course notes or handouts may be obtained from the instructor if these conditions are met. If a make-up exam is required, the instructor retains the right to determine the content of the exam and the conditions of administration, giving due consideration to equitable treatment.


Academic Honesty:

Academic dishonesty at Michigan State University is defined by the General Student Regulations as conduct that violates the fundamental principles of truth, honesty, and integrity. The following conduct is specifically cited:

Cheating -

Providing or accepting assistance with completing assignments or examinations, without proper authorization.

Plagiarism -

Supplying or using work or answers that are not one's own, without proper citation.

Fabrication -

Faking data or results.

Sabotage -

Interfering through any means with another's academic work.

Deception -

Providing false information - e.g., giving a false excuse for missing a deadline or falsely claiming to have submitted work.

Students share with the faculty a responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards. CEM 835 adheres to the policies on academic honesty specified in General Student Regulation 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site www.msu.edu.)

Unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work you completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course.  Also, you are not authorized to use the www.allmsu.com Web site or similar web sites to complete any course work in this course.

Students who violate these rules will be assigned a failing grade for the course.