Chemistry 834

Fall 2013

Analytical Chemistry

 

 

Course Organization, Lecture Syllabus and Other Important Information

 

Syllabus PDF

 

 

Chemistry 834 is the first of two courses on Advanced Analytical Chemistry. The course covers the subject areas of electronics, electrochemistry and statistical treatment of data..

 

TEXTBOOK

 

NONE required; however, the textbook is Chemical Instrumentation:  A Systematic Approach.  Third Edition, by Howard A. Strobel and William R. Heineman, John Wiley & Sons., 1989.  However, this text will not cover many concepts in the course and will be supplemented by other materials. Therefore, a senior level undergraduate analytical instrumentation text will be helpful at times, although we may provide you with the necessary reading assignments. For the electrochemistry module, the textbook entitled, A First Course in Electrode Processes (Derek Pletcher, 2nd ed., RSC Publishing, ISBN:978-1-85755-893-0, ca. $55), is suggested.


 

LECTURERS   

 

The lectures are given Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 10:20 to 11:10 AM in Room 183 Chemistry. A tentative lecture schedule is attached. The lecturers are:

 

Professor Dana M. Spence (Statistics)

dspence@chemistry.msu.edu

226 Chemistry

517.355.9715 x174

Office Hours: MWF 8:30-9:20

 

Professor Merlin Bruening (Electrochemistry)

Room 311 Chemistry

355-9715 x237

bruening@chemistry.msu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 8:30-9:20

 

Professor Gavin E. Reid (Electronics)

Room 229 Chemistry

355-9715 x 198

reid@chemistry.msu.edu

Office Hours:  Wednesday 9.00-10.00am

 

OFFICE HOURS/HELP SESSION

 

Please do your best to utilize the office hour listed above for each professor; however, if you need help and can’t make the listed times, feel free to stop by our offices.  Typically, if we are available, we will be able to assist you.  You can always email us if you would like to set up a specific time for a meeting.

 

ATTENDANCE

 

Attendance at all lectures and lab sessions is expected in CEM 834.  The course lecture will be the main mode of communication between the professor and the students.  In addition, most handouts and information will be given at the beginning of the lecture hour.  Therefore, do not be late.

 

GRADING

 

Grading will be based on your performance in each of the three modules.  Each module will conclude with an hour exam.  There may also be assigned homework and quizzes throughout the course.

 

The dates of these exams are:

 

Hour Exam I: Friday, September 27th - in class

Hour Exam II: Friday, November 1st - in class

Hour Exam III: Friday, December, 6th – in class

 

The grading of the course will be on the following basis:

 

 

Percentage of total grade

Hour Exam I

33.3%

Hour Exam II

33.3%

Hour Exam III

33.3%

 

LECTURE SYLLABUS

 

Lecture #

Date

Topic

 

Part I – Statistical Treatment of Data

1

W,  Aug 28

Course guidelines, steps in an analysis, intro to statistics

2

F,  Aug 30

Basic Estimators

 

M,  Sep 2

NO CLASS; Labor Day

3

W,  Sep 4

Error I

4

F,  Sep 6

Error II

5

M,  Sep 9

Probability and Distributions I

6

W,  Sep 11

Probability and Distributions II

7

F,  Sep 13

Confidence Intervals and Statistical tests

8

M,  Sep 16

Hypothesis Testing I

9

W,  Sep 18

Hypothesis Testing II

10

F,  Sep 20

Regression

11

M,  Sep 23

p-values

12

W,  Sep 25

Open, Review, New Material

 

F,  Sep 27

Exam I

 

Part II – Electrochemistry

13

M,  Sep 30

Overview of electrode processes

14

W,  Oct 2

Electrochemical potentials

15

F,  Oct 4

EMF, sign conventions, potential calculations

16

M,  Oct 7

Reference and ion-selective electrodes

17

W,  Oct 9

Junction potentials

18

F,  Oct 11

Kinetics of electrochemical reactions

19

M,  Oct 14

Kinetics of electrochemical reactions II

20

W, Oct 16

Mass transfer

21

F,  Oct 18

Diffusion-controlled reactions

22

M,  Oct 21

Cyclic voltammetry

23

W, Oct 23

Cyclic voltammetry

24

F,  Oct 25

Potential step methods

25

M,  Oct 28

Double-layer structure

26

W, Oct 30

Double-layer structure

 

F,  Nov 1

Exam II

 

Part III – Electronics

27

M,  Nov 4

Introduction to module, potential and current

28

W, Nov 6

Ohm’s law, symbols and units, series and parallel circuits

29

F,  Nov 8

LabVIEW project

30

M,  Nov 11

Voltage dividers, Wheatstone bridge, current balancing

31

W, Nov 13

Capacitance and inductance, frequency dependence

32

F, Nov 15

RC filters:  high pass, low pass

33

M,  Nov 18

Integration and differentiation

34

W, Nov 20

Transistors and power supplies

35

F, Nov 22

Operational amplifiers – basic rules

36

M,  Nov 25

Operational amplifiers – examples and uses

37

W, Nov 27

LabVIEW project

 

F, Nov 29

Thanksgiving – No class

38

M,  Dec 2

Digital electronics – intro and functions

39

W, Dec 4

A/D and D/A conversion

 

F,  Dec 6

Exam III

 

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES / OTHER ABSENCES FROM CLASS OR EXAMINATIONS

 

It is the responsibility of students who plan to be absent from class at certain times throughout the semester, due to religious holidays or other reasons, to make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Course notes or handouts may be obtained from the instructor if these conditions are met.

 

If an exam is missed due to a legitimate reason, a make up exam may be taken during a specified time period to be decided by the student and the professor. The instructor retains the right to determine the content of the exam and the conditions of administration, giving due consideration to equitable treatment. All absences must be brought to the attention of the professor before the exam.  Delays may result in no make-up opportunity.  In fact, there is usually no excuse for not notifying the professor in advance of a missed laboratory period or exam.  Make up exams may be substituted for an excused missed regular exam.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY

 

Cheating on exams and quizzes, and all other forms of dishonest behavior represents a violation of the University Honor Code.  The University’s policy on academic honesty can be found at https://www.msu.edu/unit/ombud/academic-integrity/index.html.   Any student violating this policy will receive a failing grade for the course.

 

The following conduct is specifically cited:

 

Cheating -       Providing or accepting assistance with completing assignments or examinations, without proper authorization.

 

Plagiarism -     Supplying or using work or answers that are not one's own, without proper citation.

 

Fabrication-     Faking data or results.

 

Sabotage-        Interfering through any means with another's academic work.

 

Deception-      Providing false information - e.g., giving a false excuse for missing a deadline or falsely claiming to have submitted work.

 

Students share with the faculty a responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards. CEM 834 adheres to the policies on academic honesty specified in General Student Regulation 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site www.msu.edu.)

 

Unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work you completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course.  Also, you are not authorized to use the www.allmsu.com Web site or similar web sites to complete any course work in this course.